Sources Cited

[1] Takeuchi, Naoko (1996).  Bishjo Senshi Sr Mn Volume Sixteen.  Tokyo: Kodansha of Japan, p. 122.

[2] Takeuchi, Naoko (1997).  Bishjo Senshi Sr Mn Volume Eighteen.  Tokyo: Kodansha of Japan, p. 34.

[3] Takeuchi, Naoko (1997).  Bishjo Senshi Sr Mn Volume Eighteen.  Tokyo: Kodansha of Japan, p. 21.

[4] Lexico LLC.  Dictionary.com: “Anima.”  (Web page);
http://www.dictionary.com/search?q=anima (Accessed 31 March 2002).

[5] Friedl, Jeffrey.  Jeffrey's Japanese<->English Dictionary Server.  (Web page); Entry (Accessed 31 March 2002).

[6] Takeuchi, Naoko (1996).  Bishjo Senshi Sr Mn Volume Sixteen.  Tokyo: Kodansha of Japan, p. 124.  Sailor Lead Crow: “This is Sailor Lead Crow, the third soldier of the Sailor Anima-Mates.”

Takeuchi, Naoko (1996).  Bishjo Senshi Sr Mn Volume Seventeen.  Tokyo: Kodansha of Japan, p. 65.  Sailor Phi: “Madame Galaxia, Tin Nyanko of the Anima-Mates...”

Takeuchi, Naoko (1997).  Bishjo Senshi Sr Mn Volume Eighteen.  Tokyo: Kodansha of Japan, p. 21.  Sailor Heavy Metal Papillon: “I am the final soldier of the Sailor Anima-Mates - the Hunter of Souls, Sailor Heavy Metal Papillon!!”

[7] Takeuchi, Naoko (1996).  Bishjo Senshi Sr Mn Volume Sixteen.  Tokyo: Kodansha of Japan, p. 42.  This shows Sailor Iron Mouse's name.

Doi, Hitoshi.  Bishoujo Senshi Sailor Moon: Sailor Iron Mouse.  (Web page);
http://www.tcp.com/doi/smoon/char/ironmouse.html (Accessed 31 March 2002).
This shows Sailor Iron Mouse's human name.  The nezu part of this name sounds like the first two syllables in nezumi, which means mouse in Japanese. The ch part sounds like the first part of the term ch ch, which is used by the Japanese to refer to a mouse's sqeak.

Takeuchi, Naoko (1996).  Bishjo Senshi Sr Mn Volume Sixteen.  Tokyo: Kodansha of Japan, p. 48.  This shows the name of Sailor Iron Mouse’s special maneuver.

Takeuchi, Naoko (1996).  Bishjo Senshi Sr Mn Volume Sixteen.  Tokyo: Kodansha of Japan, p. 87.  This shows Sailor Aluminum Seiren’s name.

Doi, Hitoshi.  Bishoujo Senshi Sailor Moon: Sailor Aluminum Siren.  (Web page);
http://www.tcp.com/doi/smoon/char/siren.html (Accessed 31 March 2002).  This shows Sailor Aluminum Seiren's human name.
The aya part of this name refers to beautiful colors.  The rei part may be referring to the kanji , which means beautiful.  The sirens and the mermaids were known for their charm and beauty.

Takeuchi, Naoko (1996).  Bishjo Senshi Sr Mn Volume Sixteen.  Tokyo: Kodansha of Japan, p. 87.  This shows the name of Sailor Aluminum Seiren’s special maneuver.

Takeuchi, Naoko (1996).  Bishjo Senshi Sr Mn Volume Sixteen.  Tokyo: Kodansha of Japan, p. 124.  This shows Sailor Lead Crow’s name.

Doi, Hitoshi.  Bishoujo Senshi Sailor Moon: Sailor Lead Crow.  (Web page);
http://www.tcp.com/doi/smoon/char/crow.html (Accessed 31 March 2002).  This shows Sailor Lead Crow's human name.
The karasu part of the name means crow.  The akane part sounds like the Japanese term akane, which refers to madder, a red dye.

Takeuchi, Naoko (1996).  Bishjo Senshi Sr Mn Volume Sixteen.  Tokyo: Kodansha of Japan, p. 139.  This shows the name of Sailor Lead Crow’s special maneuver.

Takeuchi, Naoko (1996).  Bishjo Senshi Sr Mn Volume Sixteen.  Tokyo: Kodansha of Japan, p. 139.  This shows Sailor Coronis’ name.

Takeuchi, Naoko (1996).  Bishjo Senshi Sr Mn Volume Sixteen.  Tokyo: Kodansha of Japan, p. 164.  This shows Sailor Tin Nyanko's human name.
The suzu part of the name means bell, but it sounds just like the term suzu, which means tin.

Takeuchi, Naoko (1996).  Bishjo Senshi Sr Mn Volume Seventeen.  Tokyo: Kodansha of Japan, p. 12.  This shows the name of Tin Nyanko’s special maneuver.

Takeuchi, Naoko (1996).  Bishjo Senshi Sr Mn Volume Seventeen.  Tokyo: Kodansha of Japan, p. 13.  This shows Sailor Tin Nyanko’s name.

Takeuchi, Naoko (1996).  Bishjo Senshi Sr Mn Volume Seventeen.  Tokyo: Kodansha of Japan, p. 13.  This shows Sailor Mau’s name and the name of the planet Mau.

Mau

It has been said that mau was the ancient Egyptian word for cat.  However, ancient Egyptian writing does not contain characters that represent true vowel sounds.  Therefore, Egyptologists are not exactly sure about what vowels could have been in the real ancient Egyptian word.  They do use several transliteration systems to approximate the consonant sounds in the ancient Egyptian words.  According to Raymond Faulkner's Concise Dictionary of Middle Egyptian, the ancient Egyptian word for cat was actually written this way:

To learn more about the ancient Egyptian language, read the excellent The Pronunciation of Ancient Egyptian article.  There is also an ancient Egyptian language e-mail mailing list.  I am a member!

Takeuchi, Naoko (1996).  Bishjo Senshi Sr Mn Volume Seventeen.  Tokyo: Kodansha of Japan, p. 34.  This shows Sailor Chu’s name and the name of the planet Chu.

Takeuchi, Naoko (1996).  Bishjo Senshi Sr Mn Volume Seventeen.  Tokyo: Kodansha of Japan, p. 34.  This shows Sailor Mermaid’s name and the name of the planet Mermaid.

Takeuchi, Naoko (1997).  Bishjo Senshi Sr Mn Volume Eighteen.  Tokyo: Kodansha of Japan, p. 21.  This shows Sailor Heavy Metal Papillon’s name.

Takeuchi, Naoko (1999).  Pretty Soldier Sailormoon: Materials Collection.  Tokyo: Kodansha, p. 94.  This shows the name of Sailor Heavy Metal Papillon’s special maneuver and the name of her planet.

The name Sailor Cocoon never appears in any official source.  However, Sailor Cocoon would logically be the name of the sailor soldier of the planet Cocoon.

[8] Liddell, Henry George and Scott, Robert.  An Intermediate Greek-English Lexicon.  (Web page);
Entry (Accessed 6 February 2002).

[9] WordReference.com.  French Translation: Papillon.  (Web page);
http://www.wordreference.com/fr/en/translation.asp?fren=papillon (Accessed 31 March 2002).

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